Link: Unity UI: Easy Tabs (no scripting) by Mateodon

Link -> Unity UI: Easy Tabs (no scripting) by Mateodon


The Unity UI framework comes with quite a number of tools for your disposal: Text, Buttons, Lists, Toggles, and so on. But sometimes you need a little more – something to spice up the interface you’re providing. Unity, surprisingly, has come up with a number of hooks in its UI framework, and all it takes is some simple trickery to turn these Buttons and Toggles into something completely different.

Enter Matt Graves (or “Mateodon,” his name which, I assume, dates back to his prehistoric ancestry). Matt used his dinosauric wizardry to combine multiple UI elements to create Tabs (much like the tabs in your browser (I mean, I assume they’re in your browser (What browser are you using, Internet Explorer 4?))) without a single line of code.

Give his site a checkout. He has a few good tutorials, and even has a YouTube channel.

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Link: Subsurface Scatterings – Texture-Driven Water

Link -> Texture-Driven Water by Subsurface Scatterings


I’m a simple man – I like creating big effects using a minimal amount of processing power. Sure, you can go and make something look “Industrial Light & Sound”-level good, but sometimes simple is better, depending on your situation. And one thing that’s gotten better and easier with age is Water Effects.

I came across Adeniran Moses Adeagbo Jr‘s blog while looking up some water normal maps, and his demo for Texture-Driven Water, where, not only does he utilize normal maps for creating some nice looking water (which, for most engines, is child’s play), but he pulls out a bit of refraction and Schlick’s Approximation to really get some great reflections out of it.

As a fellow Jerseyan, I gotta show some recognition for what this dude is doing. So, please, check out his site for some great tutorials.

Scope, or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Start Planning

Honestly, how much planning do you put into a project? A lot of people just dive right in and let the code take them as far down the rabbit hole has it needs to go, like a painter on a canvas. Well, guess what, Bob Ross, this is programming. There’s no happy little tree, no titanium white, and no happy little gnarly accidents that will save you. Diving in without any idea of what you’re going to be working on, or what tools or patterns you’re going to need, is the biggest killer of any project. I don’t care what you think the front-end should look like – you’ll just be left with default assets if you can’t visualize it.

I can say, at this point, I’ve been working on video games for 10 years. I can’t tell you how many projects never made it up to this blog, let alone out in to other peoples hands. All of them started with an idea, a gimmick, and then, as the project grew and got more fleshed out, more was added to it in a fever feature creeping, and then, bam, the project would die. Why? Many reasons: bloating features slowed down the game, asset creation became absurd, code became unmanageable, people dropped off the project, and so on. But it all boils down to one centralized issue:

We fell out of scope.

Continue reading “Scope, or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Start Planning”

SUDDEN GLORY Development – Particles and flashy bits

Here’s a small video of me working on some of the particle effects (and the game logic that spawns them), and some of the art assets (and the logic on how they behave).

For the particles, the idea is that when certain things get destroyed, they leave a crater behind (or some burnt wreckage). I also wanted a random chance to spawn other things, like fire, smoke, electrical arcs, and what-not. The script I created uses a “chance” variable for calculating the odds in which a special “additional” effect would spawn.

For the art, I have these big battle ships, and they have weak points for the other team to attack. However, I have no way to convey to the player that they needed to attack these points. So, I’m creating “ship components” that will flash to show they are “points of interest,” and since all you do is fly and shoot, you’ll naturally try shooting it, and it’ll explode. See? Conveyance.

More of these are likely to come. Stay tuned. I also use that channel to put up my Twitch streams, so… uhh… like and subscribe? I guess? Is that how the TubeYou works?

 

New Year, New Game, New Keith

It’s  been quite some time since I’ve made a real post on this blog. During the past few, well, years my life has been making a number of ups and downs. I landed myself a new job thanks to this blog, and now it’s time I payed some proper attention to it.

Starting with the game I’ve been working on – what, after all this time, you think I’ve just faded away and just spin my wheels? Bah, I say! It’s high time to unveil my pet project that I’ve been working on for the past 10-12 months.

Ladies and Gentlemen…

SuddenGloryLogo
GfyCat Preview Continue reading “New Year, New Game, New Keith”

David León, and his Zelda Dungeon Generation in Unity3D

Zelda Dungeon Generation in Unity3D

The other day, I found a post in Reddit’s /r/Unity3D to random procedural Zelda-style map generation using a binary-tree by a dude named David León, a game programmer. He goes on to explain his method for generating the maps, and even has downloads to his source code. He also has a bunch of other tutorials for creating a rougelike-style maps and so-on. Really great stuff, and if you’re looking for a little inspiration for random map generation, check out David León’s tumblr.

Link: Higher-Order Fun

Higher-Order Fun

Higher-Order Fun

So, my blog’s concept is nothing new: Games, programming, tutorials, the works. But everyone’s a little different and post up different content, and recently I found this blog, by Rodrigo Monteiro, where he not only posts up tutorials, game design, and even 3D game math, but he also gives his 2 cents on games and game design ideas. It’s a real great blog, and definitely one to bookmark. Here, I have a few pages of interest for you: