Links: Voronoi – Symphony Of Destruction (And More)

So, lets get to the point here: Blowing stuff up is cool.

That statement probably will put me on a list somewhere — I mean virtually blowing stuff up is cool. In games, you hit something, and pieces of it fly apart, fragments go everywhere, cool particle effects, awesome sounds, all that feedback feels very satisfying. But sometimes, in a lot of games, that feedback is just par for the game. Like, a quick flash, some little sound byte, you reticle lights up, and it’s like, “OK, I did the thing.” but it’s not very gripping. To get that level of immersion, players need to not just see something break, but really feel it. Particles can only do so much – people want to see the result of their actions. They want to see stuff break.

Continue reading “Links: Voronoi – Symphony Of Destruction (And More)”

Links: Unity Sprites: Hues & Color Swapping

Old games, am I right? Back in those days, they didn’t have any of these fancy 256 color pallets! In those days, you had only a handful to chose from, so devs had to swap out color pallets like a Bob Ross Marathon! Nowadays, if you want something to be a particular color, you just…. do it. There’s actually a lot of good videos that talk about how colors and images were achieved back in the days of limited color ranges.

Now, most of us know that, back in the days of limited colors and memory, games would fake sprite variety by swapping pallets. It worked pretty well, and resulted in some pretty awesome effects. But, unfortunately, the old ways must die, and now, with retro visuals all-the-rage these days, getting back those effects can be challenging.

Never fear, because our good friend Google is here!

HSV & HSL Shader by greggman

Just like in your favorite image editing application, this shader allows you to modify the Hue, Saturation, Value/Luminosity, and Alpha of your sprite. But that’s not all! You can also set the Affect range, so it will only modify certain colors within your image! It’s pretty nifty, and a good base-line cover-all for whatever your needs are.

Daniel Branicki: How to Use a Shader to Dynamically Swap a Sprite’s Colors

Here, we get a little more advanced. What this tutorial shows us, is how to use a shader to change the individual colors of a sprite. With this, we can get pretty powerful, because we can have control of just about every aspect of our sprite. He even goes over a little “Damage” effect, just to show what you can do with this ability.

So here are a few tools to add to your toolbox. Keep these around, and you’ll have that old school game dev feeling back in no time.

Minus the awful assembly code. Yikes.

Link: Unity UI: Easy Tabs (no scripting) by Mateodon

Link -> Unity UI: Easy Tabs (no scripting) by Mateodon


The Unity UI framework comes with quite a number of tools for your disposal: Text, Buttons, Lists, Toggles, and so on. But sometimes you need a little more – something to spice up the interface you’re providing. Unity, surprisingly, has come up with a number of hooks in its UI framework, and all it takes is some simple trickery to turn these Buttons and Toggles into something completely different.

Enter Matt Graves (or “Mateodon,” his name which, I assume, dates back to his prehistoric ancestry). Matt used his dinosauric wizardry to combine multiple UI elements to create Tabs (much like the tabs in your browser (I mean, I assume they’re in your browser (What browser are you using, Internet Explorer 4?))) without a single line of code.

Give his site a checkout. He has a few good tutorials, and even has a YouTube channel.

Link: Subsurface Scatterings – Texture-Driven Water

Link -> Texture-Driven Water by Subsurface Scatterings


I’m a simple man – I like creating big effects using a minimal amount of processing power. Sure, you can go and make something look “Industrial Light & Sound”-level good, but sometimes simple is better, depending on your situation. And one thing that’s gotten better and easier with age is Water Effects.

I came across Adeniran Moses Adeagbo Jr‘s blog while looking up some water normal maps, and his demo for Texture-Driven Water, where, not only does he utilize normal maps for creating some nice looking water (which, for most engines, is child’s play), but he pulls out a bit of refraction and Schlick’s Approximation to really get some great reflections out of it.

As a fellow Jerseyan, I gotta show some recognition for what this dude is doing. So, please, check out his site for some great tutorials.

A-Star Pathfinding Tutorial by Me!

16 x 16 Grid... You're welcome.

Hey, everyone! It’s been a few months since I posted on my blog like this, but that’s because I’ve been hard at work on a new tutorial for you all!

One of the more popular pages on this site has been a link I provided to ActiveState’s C++ A* Algorithm, and, while that’s good and all, it’s not really a tutorial by any means, and, well, it’s someone else’s stuff. I wanted to show you guys not only how it’s done, by the whos and whys.

So, without further TODOs…

Check out my A* Pathfinding Tutorial!

heroAnims
It’s got history, jokes, source code, images, the works!

Let me know what you guys think! Tell your friends! MAKE THE MACHINES BEND TO YOUR WILL!

That last part is a little exaggerated, but that’s basically what you’ll be doing!

Math Magician – Path Smoothing with Chaikin

There are a lot of algorithms out there for making something follow a path. I should know, I’ve posted a couple. The thing is, a lot of times I find myself following a path just fine, but trying to make that path smooth is pretty frustrating. Some methods might take too long to execute, or don’t really work in realtime, or are just waaay too beefy for what I’m trying to do. So, I found a pretty simple algorithm for your Game-Dev-On-The-Go to help you find the way.

Alright, here’s the setting:

You have an enemy, he’s flying in space. He flies a basic patrol that selects a random path from a collection of waypoints. You generate your path, and it returns a List of Vector3s. Watching your enemy fly a path filled with extreme <90 degree turns looks dumb. Real dumb. You start to consider taking a job in construction, but wait; there's a simple solution: what if you could just cut out those sharp corners?

Well, that's when we call in Chaikin. Continue reading “Math Magician – Path Smoothing with Chaikin”

Super Simple State Machine!

Hey all! How’ve you been?

I’ve been very busy lately. I know I don’t post often enough, but I’m working on changing that up. And, for starters, I’ve posted a brand new tutorial! Been a few years since I’ve done that, right?

Well, for you AI newbies, I’ve posted a tutorial for a Finite State Machine I made a few years ago, affectionately called the Super Simple State Machine. I even posted the code and a Unity package demo project up on my GitHub for you. Isn’t that nice?

Give the tutorial a look-see, let me know if you like what you see and you want more.

That sounded really dirty… Sorry about that. Later!