Link: Game Programming Patterns – The Observer

Link: Game Programming Patterns – The Observer

OK, first off: No, I’m not dead. 2: No, I’m not a zombie. 3: Yes, zombies are considered dead. 4: I’d like to take a moment to consider a pivotal part of any game programmer’s arsenal of design patterns: The Observer.

The observer pattern, to put it simply, is an object that will only perform a specific action when another object/objects (called “the subject”) are in a particular state. A gentleman by the name of Bob Nystrom is working on an online (and soon physical) book regarding game programming, called GameProgrammingPatterns.com. In his book, he describes the fundamentals and design of the Observer pattern in a fun and simple way that can have even the most basic programmer up-and-running with Observers in no time; like a strange digital voyeur of code.

OK. That was disturbing.

Anywho, go run over to his site, and check out the other “chapters” he’s done. His book is still a WIP, but it’s already a classic. Take care!

David León, and his Zelda Dungeon Generation in Unity3D

Zelda Dungeon Generation in Unity3D

The other day, I found a post in Reddit’s /r/Unity3D to random procedural Zelda-style map generation using a binary-tree by a dude named David León, a game programmer. He goes on to explain his method for generating the maps, and even has downloads to his source code. He also has a bunch of other tutorials for creating a rougelike-style maps and so-on. Really great stuff, and if you’re looking for a little inspiration for random map generation, check out David León’s tumblr.

Link: Two’s Complement

Link: Two’s Complement

You wanna know what always used to break my brain back in school? Two’s complement. For those of you unversed in nerd geek, i’s the computer’s way of interpreting negative and positive binary numbers by using the left-most bit as the sign.

Examples:

Lets talk in nybbles here (4 bits instead of 8). In a perfect unsigned world, the number 15 is expressed as 1111 in binary. However, speaking in signs, this is -1.

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Link: Higher-Order Fun

Higher-Order Fun

Higher-Order Fun

So, my blog’s concept is nothing new: Games, programming, tutorials, the works. But everyone’s a little different and post up different content, and recently I found this blog, by Rodrigo Monteiro, where he not only posts up tutorials, game design, and even 3D game math, but he also gives his 2 cents on games and game design ideas. It’s a real great blog, and definitely one to bookmark. Here, I have a few pages of interest for you:

 

Link to the Path: A* Pathfinding for Beginners

A* Pathfinding for Beginners

OK, so a while back I posted a link for a simple implementation for A* Pathfinding for C/C++. The page gets a bunch of hits, but I get a lot of people asking me to explain it. Well, it’s not my code to really explain, and I haven’t tested it out for myself. Rather than go through and make a huge tutorial, I figured I’d take the lazy route, and provide you with a resource to help explain it a bit. This page breaks down A*Pathfinding to the basics and gives a great explanation down to even the heuristics (If you don’t know that word, you’ll need this link).

So, now with this in hand, pathfinding should be easier to grasp now. Give it another go, and let me know how it turns out! Good luck!

Indie Game: Slender

Slender, by Parsec Productions

Some people out there are pretty messed up. I’ve see a lot of creepypastas about games, like the Luna Game series and all the BEN/Haunted Majora’s Mask videos. These stories can put an uneasy feeling in your stomach.

Then, along comes a game that makes you afraid to go out at night…

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Kotaku: It’s Not A Glitch. It’s A Feature. It’s Art. It’s Beautiful.

Kotaku: It’s Not A Glitch. It’s A Feature. It’s Art. It’s Beautiful.

I love game glitches. I’m currently making a game centered around glitches. This post on Kotaku by Patricia Hernandez really captures the wonder and excitement behind finding these priceless flaws in human error.

Finding a glitch is like finding gold. Finding MISSINGNO., going to World -1, or even tilting a cartridge – it makes you feel like an adventurer that has traveled beyond the game. If you love glitches, you’ll want to read this, and sink deep into nostalgia.

Logo for the Kotaku, copyright Gawker Media
Logo for the Kotaku, copyright Gawker Media (Photo credit: Wikipedia)